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around the world are concerned about it. it used to be the case that they were more concerned about the eurozone than the fiscal cliff. now things have changed. they often ask about it and its resolution. >> what do you think the impact could be globally? we're looking at a time when the global recovery is fragile at best. >> the u.s. is about 20% of the global economy. if the u.s. suffers as a result of the fiscal cliff, a complete wiping out of its growth, it is going to have repercussions around the world. if the u.s. economy has two% less growth, it will probably be a 1% less growth in mexico, canada, in europe, and japan. there will be ripple effects. >> are you worried about this? >> yes. of course i worry about it. the u.s. is a big chunk of the global economy. it has often been a driver of growth. to have that large player virtually shut in a recession would be bad news for the rest of the world. we do not think that's at the moment. we do not want to have this effect on a french our recovery. >> what would your message be to members of both parties on capitol hill and to th
. >>> abe time time this morning for a telephone call with u.s. president barack obama. they talked about meeting next month in washington. it would be abe's first foreign visit after forming a new government. he's made strengthening the japan-u.s. relationship a priority. we have more from washington. >> people in the obama administration place a high priority on stability in the asia-pacific. they have been troubled by increase in tension between japan and china over which country owns the islands in the east china sea. and they're concerned the conflicting flames allowed to fester, it could unsettle the dynamic in the region. they want to see security policies and sophisticated diplomacy to calm the situation. u.s. leaders are worried of being drawn into a military confrontation because of their alliance with japan. >> our message to the new japanese government is the same assed to former japanese government, is that we want to see both japan and china avoid provocative acts. we want to see them talk to each other and work this through by dialogue. >> reporter: now japan is tied up in
u.s. spending for defense at $699 billion. >> we can reduce that by well over a $100 billion a year. >> the range of new threats include cyber threats, bio threats, and a host of non-state actors. >> how do you do all of this on the budgets we have for the armed forces given the debt situation we have in our own country? >> that's going to be, i think, in many ways the biggest debate within the military, if not, in society at large. (instrumental music) >> in a democracy agreement is not essential, but participation is. >> never before in our history have we been so inter-connected with the rest of the world. >> foreign policy is actually not foreign. >> america has faced great hardship before and each time we have risen to the challenge. >> the ultimate test is to move our society from where it is to where it has never been. >> join us as we explore today's most critical global issues. join us for great decisions. (instrumental music) >> great decisions is produced by the foreign policy association, inspiring america's to learn more about the world. sponsorship of great decisions i
on the first part of that. >> democracy now! questions u.s. climate negotiator jonathan pershing about criticism of the failure to do more to cut emissions and save the planet from catastrophic climate change. we will speak with ronny jumeau and martin khor of the south centre in malaysia, and then anjali appadurai. >> you have been negotiating my whole life, you have failed to meet targets and a broken promises. >> a year after calling on world figures to do more to save the planet, the 22-year-old american college student was banned from the climate talks here in doha for the first week. she joins us today h. then we look at how the koch brothers are influencing climate policy.politic this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. the death toll from a massive typhoon in the southern philippines has doubled to more than 270 people. typhoon bopha is the most southerly typhoon ever recorded in the western pacific and the strongest to hit the philippines this year. 80,000 people have been forced to flee their homes. we will have more from doha after
killed in a u.s. drone strike in the pakistani region of north waziristan. the attack targeted a home with a pair of missiles. pakistani intelligence says the victims were suspected militants. the syrian government is accusing western leaders of drumming up support for foreign military intervention by invoking a month on fears of chemical weapons. this week, president obama warned president bashar al-assad against chemical weapons, about an unspecified consequences. speaking to leaders in brussels, hillary clinton followed suit. >> our concerns are that an increasingly desperate assad regime may turn to chemical weapons, or may lose control of them to one of the many groups that are now operating within syria. so as part of the absolute unity we have on this issue, we have sent an unmistakable message that this would cross a red line. those responsible would be held to account. >> in response to the threat, assad's regime has assisted it will not use chemical weapons against its own people, calling an assertion to the contrary to a pretext for intervention. >timothy geithner is says t
the obama administration has conducted more than 200,000 deportations of parents with children who are u.s. citizens over a period of about two years. according to federal data, nearly one-quarter of all deportations from july 1, 2010 to the end of the september for issued for parents with u.s. citizen children. colorlines reports the data appears to dash hopes that new guidelines issued for deportations last year would curb the separation of families by immigration and customs enforcement. the prosecutorial discretion guidelines instruct ice agents to focus on certain immigrants, including those with criminal convictions, and to consider a person's ties to the country and "whether the person has a u.s. citizen or permanent resident spouse, child, or parent" when making deportation decisions. a group of new jersey residents who say they're subjected to surprise pre-dawn, immigration rates has reached a settlement of the federal government. most of the plaintiffs were either citizens or lawful residents of the united states when they said armed immigration and customs and mores and agents i
of the third age on the silver screen. >> hello, thanks for being with us. russian president putin has signed a bill which bans americans from adopting russian children. the controversial move is said to be part of russia's retaliation against an american law that puts sanctions on officials suspected of human rights violations. some senior government officials in moscow have spoken out against that law, but supporters argue the ban's necessary, because some adopted children have faced abuse by american families. joining me from moscow now is steve rosenberg. steve, you said he'd do it, he's done it. >> that's right, david. there's been one question that has dominated political life in moscow the last few days and that is will he or won't he? will president putin sign what is one of the most controversial laws he's been face with. yesterday he indicated he probably would and today he signed it. as you mentioned it has been very controversial because a number of ministers in his own government, including the russian foreign minister have publicly criticized the law and president putin's critic
you with us. members of congress came together for the annual lighting of the capitol christmas tree, although they were deadlocked on matters. religious groups advocated for action on the fiscal cliff and other issues. a coalition of religious leaders, law enforcement and business people urged lawmakers to prioritize immigration reform. the group included both liberal and conservative clergy who called for legislation that respects the dignitiy of immigrants and creates a pathway to citizenship and secures the border. >> it's time to secure on you values, values that include, faith and hope and charity. >> jewish groups are divided over israel's plans to construct new settlements in the west bank and east jerusalem. the controversial announcement came a day after the united nations voted last week to recognize palestine as a nonmember state. the union for reformed judaism called is a challenge, but it denounced the u.n. vote as counter-productive to peace. >>> a prominent group of orthodox rabbis meanwhile voiced its support for israel's decision. >>> in a letter released by the vet
violence in the united states. >> in the coming weeks i'll use whatever power this office holds to engage my fellow citizens from law-enforcement to mental health professionals to parents and educators in an effort aimed at preventing more tragedies like this. because what choice do we have? we cannot accept events like this as routine. are we really prepared to say we are powerless in the face of such carnage? that the politics are too hard? are we prepared to say that such violence visited on our children year after year after year is somehow the price of our freedom? among the six adults killed, all women, was the principal and a psychologist, both who lunged at the shooter when he first came into the school, and the teachers protecting their students. as news of the massacre spread friday, a group of demonstrators gathered outside the white house to coffers stricter gun control and better services for the mentally ill. >> i think we have a real problem with identifying mental illness in this country. i think we ever problem of treating people with problems. we need to break at the boo
walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs stations from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: always pleased to welcome anne lamott to the program. her latest project is called, i love this, "help, thanks, wow: the three essential prayers." i love the title. i love the book. i love the packaging. i love the layout. >> thank you. tavis: it packs a powerful punch. how're people responding to a run the country? >> great, but i brought to a little something, a present for you when your mother. i brought a present. this is for you. this is a cross that the children at st. andrew's presbyterian made. that is the star of bethlehem and the chute of jesse. we bake them in the oven. this is the burleigh one, the roses, the animating love of the universe. -- the girly one, the roses, the animating love of the universe. tavis: my mother watches this show every night. >> where did you put that across? tavis: i will bring it home for christmas, mom. ♪ i'll be home for christmas ♪ >> get ove
in u.s. history. president obama defeated mitt romney forcing the republicans to reconsider their policies among others returning women and immigrants. while the major party presidential candidate did not take on fossil fuel, climate change in any of their debates, it was a year of extreme weather from melting of the arctic to superstorm sandy to the massive typhoon in the philippines. 2012 will also be remembered for a series of mass shootings from aurora, arata, to the sikh temple, to be shooting in newtown, conn.. the case around trayvon martin sparked national protest after officials refused to arrest george zimmerman. president obama continues his secret drone wars. we spend the hour looking back at the moment and movements that shaped 2012. >> democratic congresswoman gabrielle giffords has announced she will step down this week. she was shot in the head last year in a shooting spree that left six people dead in tucson. >> thank you for your prayers and for giving me the time to recover. i have more work to do on my recovery, so i will do what is best for arizona. i wi
surrounding the talks, treasury secretary timothy geithner warned this week the u.s. will not be able to pay its creditors after monday unless the debt ceiling is raised. we will have more on the fiscal cliff talks, speaking with congressmember dennis kucinich after the headlines. environmental protection agency head lisa jackson has announced a resignation ahead of president obama's second term. jackson departs after a four- year tenure that saw advances in the regulation of environmentally harpo practices such as mountaintop removal and the emissions of harmful chemicals from industrial plants. it was marred by a number of key disappointments on environmental issues. president obama rejected jackson's proposal for tougher regulations on smog pollution last year, even though jackson submitted a proposal she viewed as a major compromise. she has recently tried to impose restrictions on carbon emissions from new power plants, drawing a concerted republican and corporate pushback. after ignoring global warming in the 2012 campaign, obama has recently vowed to address it during his second term.
achievement of nelson mandela is the normality here. people used to be afraid that when he died, the country might fall apart. well, there is real anxiety about his health now, but no one thinks the south africa is in danger. >> let's go live to the conference to speak to milton. i and the end, the vote was not that close, was it? -- in the end, the vote was not that close, was it? >> in the end the president was elected by over 2000 votes. only 900 for the challenger. it is clear that they want him to lead south africa for another seven years. >> let's look at the process that got him there. but we have heard criticisms. what does the process tell us about the state of this amazing party once led by nelson mandela? >> this process tells us one thing, that the party of nelson mandela was plagued by sectionalism and serious allegations of corruption, which is how we got to this conference. there were accusations that president jacob zuma, for example, took public funds from the state coffers and renovated his private home. they are currently leading an investigation into that allegation. >> t
experts used data from previous launches to make their estimate. they say a missile launched in 2009 had a range of almost 7,000 kilometers. north korean officials tried again in april. that one exploded shortly after takeoff, but the first booster burned 18 seconds longer than those used in previous attempts. the experts believe engineers may have succeeded in reducing the size of a nuclear warhead. south korean officials say workers have completed the assembly of the three-stage missile. they say once the crew injects the fuel, it will be ready to go. authorities in pyongyang say they'll launch between the 10th and 22nd of this month. they say they're sending a satellite into orbit, but leaders of japan and other countries believe the north koreans are carrying out a test of a long-range ballistic missile. >>> the senior u.s. diplomat on north korea has warned the leadership there. he said the u.s. will refer the matter to the u.n. security council if they go ahead with the launch. >> we will be prepared to work with our partners, including the united nations security counc
in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: please welcome alicia keys to this program. the 14-time grammy winner is out with her first album in years after the birth of her son in egypt. it is called, as if you did not know, "girl on fire." from the disk, here is the video to the title track "girl on fire." ♪ we got our feet on the ground, and we are burning it down ooh oh oh oh got our head in the clouds, and we are not coming down this girl is on fire this girl is on fire fire walking on this girl is on fire everybody stands as she goes by, because they can see the flame that is in her eyes ♪ tavis: being gone for three years. a baby. you learned that, taking three years off. three years in this business is so long. what trepidation, what angst, if any, does someone have when they have tried to put together a project that is three years in the making? >> this whole project, this whole time in my life, it really represents an important time for me. it is funny you bring up that word. i
businesses major corporations. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> can u.s. politicians reached a deal to stop tax rises in spending cuts from damaging the american and the global economy? hillary clinton is being treated at this hospital in new york. she has a blood clot. there's concern over the health of the venezuelan president who has suffered complications after cancer surgery in cuba. walk into bbc world news. coming up, and look back at the british troops as they prepared handover to afghan forces. new zealand becomes the first major city to welcome 2013. time is running out for politicians in the united states to strike a deal to prevent the economy from going over the so- called fiscal cliff. that is when a package of automatic spending cuts and tax rises comes into fact which could set the country back into recession. that less than 20 hours into the generate the first deadline. >> as night descended on washington, no deal precentors went home with a low over 24 hours to go before the huge austerity package known as the fiscal cliff, something almost nobody wa
of the call they made. let's go to duncan kennedy, joining us from sydney. >> in many ways, this was a very difficult interview for these two to carry out. it was too full. it was emotional. not surprisingly, they have been receiving counseling because of all the public anger directed at them. they said they wanted to tell their story. more importantly, they wanted to say sorry. >> today, michael christian and mel greig are two yong people under intense -- two young people under intense pressure. >> emerging after days in hiding to give their version e theirvents. in a raw -- version of events. in a raw and tearful interview, they said they were guided by what had happened -- gutted by what had happened, the death of jacintha saldanha. >> we could not see this happening. >> do you feel sick now that you were saying this was a highlight of your career, you are excited about getting a call through to get to this moment? >> we could not foresee what was going to happen in the future. >> the two disc jockeys said it was others at their radio station who took the decision to broadcast the phone
birth. is that intended as the literal truth in matthew and luke? the gospels give us one description of the birth of jesus. do archaeology and history give us another? joining us to answer these questions areu.s. open, the aute brand new "jesus of nazareth cunning of the and jeffrey sheler author of the brand new "is the bible truth?" >>> tell us what you think happened at bethlehem, jeffrey she'ller. >> well when we read two gospels, only two of the four gospels even talk about the birth of jesus and when we read matthew and luke, those two gospels, we are certainly presented with different details surrounding the story of the birth but despite the differences there are several things that clearly come through and those are the important aspects of the story. one, that jesus was born in bethlehem. to a virgin named mary. whose husband, joseph, was of the lineage of david. and this according to the writers of those two gospels was in fulfillment of the hebrew prophesies. so despite very clear and seemingly troubling contradictions in some of the details the more important
many japanese to question the use of atomic energy. the former government said it would aim to take all react ors off line within a couple of decades but now a new government is in power and promising a different approach. >> reporter: kaho izumitani is putting everything on the table when it comes to energy policy. they will explore possibilities including restarting nuclear reactors. >> translator: we need to decide our energy policy based on technical assessments. we will not start with the conclusion of halting nuclear power generation by the 2030s. >> reporter: the previous administration led by former prime minister yoshihko noda drafted an energy policy that stated the government would aim to shut down all nuclear plants by the 2030s. before last year's accident in fukushima, nuclear power accounted for 26% of the total energy supply in japan. currently only two out of 50 reactors in the country are online adding a mere 3% to the supply. fossil fuels are taking up the slack. utilities are paying more to import liquified natural gas to fire thermal plants. many are planning to rai
to the fact that we have a buys, all of us, consumers, physicians, we assume that new means improved. and in fact, what is really true is that needs to be established by solid evidence and not just assumption. this is a very important study for the federal government. very important study for state government. because this category of drugs is a substantial expense for the medicaid program. >> what's the cost between haldol and the new drug that came out? >> it's a difference between haldol and a entire category, the a typical antisigh cotics. it's a many expense. that doesn't mean haldol is the right drug for every patient but what this study demonstrate said when you look at a large population, for a substantial number of patients, the older now available as a generic drug, is in fact more effective at controlling symptoms than the newer category of drugs. so it just speaks to the issue of first of all, the treatment needs to be at a lord to the individual and that if -- tailored -- we need to enter into the prescribing process with an open mind whether in fact this new drug offers
is 1% of the budget and we talk about cutting that and that's a frightening thought. while some of us are eating at banquets while people are starving outside our door. that's not right. >> to pass a comprehensive tax reform that would get rid of most of the deductions. not charitable deductions however, charitable deductions are critical to civil society, but to eliminate a lot of loop holes and to bring about a bipartisan effort to get the government on a sound footing. >> the principal is you've got to protect poor and vulnerable people as you find a path to fiscal sustainability. both are moral issues. >> it's hard to overestimate the importance of getting healthcare to 40 or 50 million people who did not have access to it before. that's just huge and as the wealthiest nation in the world, not to have healthcare for all was just a profound embarrassment. >> as bishops we've been working on healthcare reform for years. now there are issues about the healthcare reform that's been passed, the affordable healthcare act, that we have concerns about, one, some of the conscience issues.
want you to know that you're wrong. this isn't, there's nobody else, there's just us. we are failing. >> you really believe this story, osama bin laden? >> yeah. >> what convinced you. >> her confidence. >> if you're right, the whole world's going to want in on this. you will never find him. >> it is one of the few moments >> rose: this is movie journalism that snaps and stains and par fi the decades clamor and clutter into narrative clarity with a sale tree kick. joining me is scribe writer mark boal and director of zero dark thirty kathryn bigelowing i'm very please to do have them back at this table, welcome. >> thank you. >> rose: i don't know where to start. let me start with the idea of bin laden and his, and the search to find him. when did that get inside your brain so that you thought maybe maybe. >> sometime, i don't remember exactly when. >> rose: it was before hurt locker was it not. >> it was around then, and after hurt locker was finished we were talking about what the next picture might be. with a decided to focus on the attempt to kill bin laden in torabora in 2001
, is happening to us. whatever's happening in the asian community, that's us. instead of possessive commodified investment in our identities, we need to take possessive investment in our other communities' struggles. >> the life and work of junot diaz contain many worlds, and that makes him all the more worth listening to. his imagination travels between the old and the new, between the america that was and the america we're becoming. straddling different cultures, yet american to the core -- he seems to be looking in every direction at once -- a spotter of the future, a curator of the past, a man very much of the here and now. in his first book, "drown" and in "the brief wondrous life of oscar wao" -- the novel that won him the pulitzer prize, diaz writes in short, vivid strokes of realspeak. his recent collection of short stories, "this is how you lose her," was a finalist for the national book award. diaz, the novelist, once considered becoming an historian and to this day he summons his creative gifts by looking to his own past. he was born in the dominican republic, part of that caribbean
of americans hope that is true. but it's not enough for us to hope. we have to speak up. we have made our voices heard and hold washington accountable for facing up to the epidemic of gun violence in our country. if this moment passes in to memory without action from washington, it will be a stain upon our nation's commitment to protecting the innocence innocent including our children. >> rose: i'm pleased to have mayor bloomberg back at this table. >> thank you for having me. >> rose: on "meet the press" yesterday, at a press conference today you believe that the time is now, that this is the moment to act, and at the same time you are chastising the president for-- i believe the time was a long time ago, the president gave a speech after the massacre in a-- aurora, colorado, saying we have to do something. here we are two years later, another 21,000 people in america killed with guns. we've done nothing. i mean, you know, i don't know at what point you have to say enough is enough. we've been killing 34 americans every single day. that's bigger than virginia tech. every single day. and
, to us it is the decision of communities gathering together and realizing that they have a voice and a responsibility to sort of unite and engage in these issues that are happening each day and deciding for themselves whether they want it. >> i forgot what it was like to start from, you know, the open laptop and that was just really fun, i just, my wife said to me in the middle of the whole thing, she says no matter what happens if you never make this movie, i haven't seen you this happy, at least remember how much fun it is to write. >> rose: a look at the economy and a look at the movies when we continue. funding for charlie rose was provided by the captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin tonight with an assessment of the u.s. and global economy, all eyes remain on efforts to avoid the fiscal cliff deadline on january 1st, when automatic spending cuts and tax increases are set to take hold. there is growing optimism on capitol hill that a deal could come soon, yesterday president obama said he would
stand up and do was's right for us. >> rose: each day 34 americans are murdered by guns. >> yes. >> rose: this is what you call for. congress passing the fix gun checks act. >> yup. >> rose: which would close a loophole. >> well, 40% of the guns-- let me step back. congress voted some laws to be tough. congress always does this. they're so tough, for those that were sorry about a massacre, they voted no guns in the hands of criminals or drug addicts or psychiatric problems, people with psychiatric problems or minorities. and then, of course, they don't fund it they don't fund the enforcement so they can say to both sidesness don't worry about t i'm with you babes, but both sides. 40% of the guns that are sold in this country are sold either over the internet or at gun shows and the federal law-- the federal laws don't cover that, so you have to change that law. that is one thing that congress should do. and that's this gun check act. second, they've got to pass a ban on assault weapons. you know, the founding fathers never thought about assault weapons. they were talking about a militia,
anything to us. we have to make our own music, we have to make music for our generation, for our friends. >> rose: right. >> and it is not -- we are going to wipe the slate clean. >> rose: gustavo dudamel and david byrne when we continue. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: maestro gustavo dudamel is here, berlin philharmonic once called him the most astonishingly talented conductor industry ever come across. he is beloved bolivar orchestra in vendz well, ven venezuela anw is with the la philharmonic. ♪ >> rose: he is in new york to, bolivar orchestra in carnegie called, voices from latin america, also dedicated further musical education and social justice around the world, i am pleased to have gustavo dudamel at this table for the first time. >> thank you. it is an honor. >> rose: my pleasure. >> huge honor. >> rose: we have been wanting to do this for a while. tell me about the music you have selected for the performance. >> yes. this is a festival called
wear. >> my obituary. >> what would you want us to say? would music be in the first sentence or two? >> no, i will say exactly what i said to the meerning extras. many singers. here lies ricardo muti, a crazy man that spent all his life trying to find a correct qafer or quarter note. >> rose: in pursuit of that your life was. >> that is a disaster. >> rose: but music has been good to you. >> very, very good. you know, music is the only art. and i know this by experience that can bring people together. and make people to communicate even if they don't speak the same language, if they have different religions. so when you left lascala, why did you leave? >> as i said, i was there for 19 years, longer than anybody elsement longer even than tuscanini and my relationship with the orchestra and chorus has been always for 19 years perfect. then when i had a fight with the administration, let's say, because i don't want to indicate this or that person, then everything became political. and in italy when something becomes political, and controversial, politically speaking then the only thing
of work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stem punker out. -- stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station by viewers like you. thank you. tavis: pleased to welcome keira knightley to this program. starting this friday, you can catch her in the film adaptation of the tolstoy classic "anna karenina." before we get to the new project, though, here, just a small sampling of some of her other memorable work. >> had not your pride been heard by my honesty by admitting scruples. could you expect me to progress in the interior d of your circumstances? >> those are the words of a gentleman? you were the last man in the world i could ever be prevailed upon to marry. >> dyou do know what i am talking about, don't you? you knew before i did. >> why are you crying? >> freedom in moderation. >> precisely. >> i am sure your full the best intentions. i dare say it would not spend my so vague statement. the concept of freedom is an absolute. more cannot -- one cannot be more directly dead or moderately free. it must always b
have work to do. walmart committed $2 billion to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. tavis: pleased to welcome richard gere to this program. the talented actor and tireless human rights advocate stars in a new film out now called "arbitrage." the movie is the story of a troubled hedge fund manager and also stars susan sarandon and tim roth, so here now a scene from "arbitrage." >> everybody wins, if we sell the company. if i live for you. >> you don't have to live. you didn't know about it. that is why didn't tell you. >> that will take away my brokerage license. delmar to supervisor chu. my name in every paper. -- failure to supervise you. >> because it is my job. >> it is illegal, and i am your partner. >> you are not my partner. you work for me. that's right, you work for me. everybody works for me. tavis: i have been so anxious to talk to you. thank you for coming. >> no, it's a great pleasure. tavis: oh, we've done some radio before, but never on television. >> we
in the customers' perspective. >> it used to be just you have no cook, be a very good chef and i thought i was the last -- when i started cooking i saw the last of this age of the great chef where you had to be the greatest technician. now it's not like that anymore because once you became the greatest technician you didn't have the ability to open up your own restaurant anymore. and things started to change. in the '90s there were five or six restaurants where if you wanted to learn about cooking you had to work there. and now that's not the case anymore. and i have just the utmost respect for the old school tradition, the history behind it and everybody that's done it the right way and it -- i have a hard time justifying my place with that world. >> cooking is a simple equation, no matter if it's fine dining at our level, casual dining or fast food. it's about product, about execution. so, yes, you need to have that quality product and you need to have people who can execute it. so it's really trying to bring those two together, that strong team that has a common vision, a common goal an
in the meantime. bbc news reported from manila. >> joining us from the manila via telephone is the head of the philippine red cross. scale of this is huge. how are you coping? cracks are people at have been moving over the last three days preparing after this tragedy. i am sorry about the poor people that lost their homes and everything. some of them are crammed into evacuation centers. some don't have roofs. the roads are littered with debris, trees, electrical. all entries have destroyed some homes and have been brought down by mudflows. many people severely affected as well as communication, but that is starting to be restored slowing. we must provide food and shelter right away. the red cross has provided 500 tents to one province and another 200 to another province. water has been provided because water has been contaminated. there are sanitation and hygiene kits. toothbrushes and everything. we are trying to restore some normality for these people. >> do you need international help? >> yes. we have launched an appeal centered on shelter and livelihood, in the hope of providing the
at her life, her achievements. >> streep hopes to use what she learned from the parter her push for national women's history museum. >> i don't know if i have anything even approaching her grit and that is the word, gosh, i wish i did. make everything a lot easier. i think she battled forward with unrelenting determination. i wish i had that same strength in purpose. i just have my beliefs that it's a good idea. >> streep came to washington, d.c. this week for a gala in support. congress is stalling the sale of the site to build the museum. >> we're not asking for money, for funds or anything just permission to be -- to buy a federal building with our very own money. we're asking to give the government a check, it's really galling that you have get on your knees. i suppose that's what we have to do in the nicest possible way. >> what do you want to see in the museum, artists like yourself? >> i want to see things like -- things that are lost to us, stories like, when i grew up there was very little women's history in my history textbook. fit was a little box. clara barton in the
about. i can tell you that when i was mayor of that same city, burlington, vermont, we used to hold press conferences. you would have four or five or six different radio stations showing up. you know, we'd be talking about the school board or the city council local issues. now if we're lucky we'll have one radio station showing up. and that's true all over the united states of america. and the point he is not right wing or even left wing. the point is that the tendency of corpoporate america is not t discuss at length the real issues that impact ordinary people. if you owned a television station, for example, do you think you'd be talking about the impact that citizens united has on the american political system, when you're receiving huge amounts of money because of citizens united? if you are general electric, which has been a major outsourcer of jobs to china and other countries, do you think you're going to be talking about trade policy in the united states of america or maybe nuclear power in the united states of america? >> but this puzzles me. the fcc tried to do essentially
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